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Project Rwanda

Project Rwanda

A United Nations Clean Development Mechanism project, 600,000 advanced water filters and 600,000 high efficiency cookstoves will be distributed to the poorest 30% of households, about 3 million people.

The water filters comply with WHO and Rwandan standards and eliminate microbiological contamination. The cookstoves use less wood and burn more efficiently, thereby reducing climate harming greenhouse gases and helping to reduce diseases caused by air pollution.

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600,000
Water Filters

Image: Cookstove

600,000
Cookstoves

Image: People

3 Million
People

Project Fundamentals

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Distribution

Providing high quality stoves and water filters under the authority of the Government of Rwanda and through established community mechanisms including community meetings and community leadership.

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Behaviour Change

Health education and training will be provided at a local level so as to ensure consistent and correct use of the filters and stove.

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Pay for Performance

The project falls under the UN's Clean Development Mechanism, with carbon credits being earned only after rigorous external monitoring of continued use of the new water filters and cookstoves and the resultant benefits.

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How It Works

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Project Benefits

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Reduce water borne diseases

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Reduce smoke inhalation

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Increase productivity

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New employment opportunities

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Reduce carbon emissions

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Improve health education

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What?

DelAgua's health programme in Rwanda is targeted at providing individual households with a ready supply of clean drinking water and an improved efficient means of cooking. In common with about half the world's population, most Rwandan households currently use firewood for indoor fuel.

Image: Fire and Water

Why?

Most households use firewood for cooking and some use it to treat water by boiling. The use of biomass contributes to deforestation and gives rise to harmful indoor air emissions, resulting in an adverse impact on both public health and economic development.

THE PILOT
 
SMART TECHNOLOGY
 
BIOMASS AS FUEL
 

In July 2012, DelAgua piloted the deployment of the Rwanda programme through one Umudugudu (a village-level group of homes) in the Western Province of Rwanda. 100 Vestergaard-Frandsen LifeStraw Family 2.0 water filters and EcoZoom Dura cookstoves were distributed at an Umuganda – a community meeting and work-day.

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Distributions were logged with barcodes linked to household identification numbers, and complete records were uploaded real-time over smartphones to the cloud.

The distributions were followed by household level education and follow up visits by Ministry of Health community health workers to track the performance of the programme, and to map each installation with GPS coordinates collected on the smartphone-based survey.

Image: The Pilot

LifeStraw Family 2.0 Water Filter

The LifeStaw Family 2.0 is a high volume point-of-use water filter. It converts microbiologically contaminated water into clean, safe drinking water, filtering up to 30,000 litres. This is enough to supply a family of five with clean drinking water for three to five years. It works by using advanced hollow fibre technology. Water is forced through narrow fibres under high pressure, clean water then exits through tiny pores in the walls of the hollow fibres and deposits into the safe storage container. The filter removes virtually all bacteria, protozoan parasites and viruses. Turbidity is also reduced by filtering particulate matter larger than 0.02 microns.

  • Enhanced estimated lifetime filtration capacity of 30,000 litres.
  • Filter removes virtually all bacteria (99.9999 percent), protozoan parasites (99.99 percent) and viruses (99.999 percent) that can contaminate water
  • Made of durable plastic
  • Doesn’t require electricity, batteries or replacement parts
Image: LifeStraw2.0

EcoZoom Dura Cookstove

The Zoom Dura Cookstove provides a cleaner cooking stove solution by reducing fuel usage by up to 60% and smoke emissions by up to 70%. This means less toxic smoke is inhaled by cooks and their families, and fewer resources are needed for fuelling stoves. The cookstove burns wood and other dry solid biomass. It features an abrasion resistant insulated combustion chamber that forces gases to mix with flames, decreasing harmful emissions through supreme burn efficiency.

  • Sturdy steel handles with silicone grips keep handles cool while stove is hot
  • Durable three-pronged cast iron top offers stability for any pot or pan
  • Reinforced metal door frame for increased durability
  • Refractory metal lined combustion chamber
Image: Dura Cookstove

About half of the world's population uses unsustainable, biomass-based energy sources for indoor fuel. The daily use of biomass as a fuel contributes to extensive forest degradation and deforestation and harmful indoor air emissions that are prevalent in low-income countries, and imposes an unnecessary burden on the public health and economic development of the vulnerable populations of these countries. Rwanda now faces a growing wood fuel deficit. DelAgua is addressing these problems through one of the biggest programmes of its kind anywhere in the world.

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Phase One

Phase 1
 
Phase 2
 
Phase 3
 
Phase 4
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The first phase of the programme, covering 15 Umudugudu was completed in October 2012. 147 community health workers were trained and devices were distributed at Umuganda meetings – a community based meeting and work day.

Image: Family

10,000
People

10,000 People Icon

15
Villages (Umudugudu)

Education

Health education is the cornerstone of making our project a success. By enabling behaviour change to encourage the use of improved water treatment and cooking methods through community health workers, we increase the chances of having a health impact.

Equipment distributions are followed by household level education and ongoing visits by community health workers to track the performance of the programme, and to map each installation with GPS coordinates collected on the smartphone-based survey.

The name of our health campaign is Tubeho Neza, which roughly translates as “Live well” or “Be well”.

Phase Two

Phase 1
 
Phase 2
 
Phase 3
 
Phase 4
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The second phase of the programme sees the beginning of large scale distribution. This work began on 15th September 2014.

We will be providing updates from Rwanda throughout the programme on our Blog.

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500,000
People

10,000 People Icon

2,600
Villages (Umudugudu)

Evaluation

DelAgua is partnering with several universities and the Ministry of Health to conduct controlled research studies on our programmes. These independent studies are designed to examine the technology adoption, behaviour change and public health impacts of our programmes. Our research programme is conducted in partnership with the Rwanda Ministry of Health, with oversight and approval from the Rwanda National Ethics Committee.

Continued financing of our programme and the anticipated expansion thereof through all of Rwanda is conditional upon the demonstrated coverage and use of the intervention hardware. A research team led by Portland State University and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine is responsible for evaluating the adoption rates and health impacts of the technologies. This is conducted through two primary activities:

1. A controlled research trial to evaluate health impacts and adoption

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, with Emory University, the Oregon Health and Science University and the University of Rwanda, are conducting a large scale randomised controlled trial across the western province of Rwanda in 2015 to evaluate the effectiveness of the DelAgua intervention.

This evaluation focuses on “outcomes” (e.g., fewer cases of disease) and “impact” (lower healthcare costs, increased school attendance and productivity) rather than “inputs” (e.g. number of units delivered or people covered). At the same time, since reducing exposure is a necessary condition to the effectiveness of environmental health interventions, the research team is monitoring the impact of the intervention on critical intermediate outcomes such as microbiological water quality and indoor air quality.

The study employs a randomised controlled design to evaluate the impact of the intervention on environmental exposure indicators for water quality and indoor air quality in a sample of the target population and a control group.

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2. Instrumented monitoring of a sample of the installed technologies to evaluate adoption

Within the randomised controlled trial, a sample of the households will receive water filters and cookstoves equipped with cellular network based remotely reporting sensors that record the performance and usage.

Reporting remotely can provide solutions to many of the issues around sustainability of water treatment, energy and poor infrastructure in developing communities such as unreliable survey data and relying on spot checks to assess performance.

Once the technology interventions are instrumented with the Portland State University sensor package, surveys of families and communities who have monitoring devices will be conducted to determine differences between survey data and the monitoring system. Specifically, usage and performance data will be recorded to gain insight into the operational effectiveness.

In parallel, a blinded reactivity study is being conducted within the randomised controlled trial, to evaluate if knowledge of the sensors impacts the households behaviour.

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Phase Three

Phase 1
 
Phase 2
 
Phase 3
 
Phase 4
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The third phase of the programme will see 1 million people receive cookstoves. This phase of work will also include development of a long term retail campaign to make cookstoves and filters available for purchase, initially from a central location in Kigali.

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1,000,000
People

10,000 People Icon

6,000
Villages (Umudugudu)

Monitoring

DelAgua utilises mobile data collection and a central database for programme implementation, analysis and record keeping. All distributions, education and evaluation activities are conducted through smart-phone based database tools.

During distribution, the community health workers log the names, phone numbers and national identification numbers of the recipients and scan barcodes of the distributed technologies.

During household visits, the team re-scan barcodes and take household identification information, as well as GPS coordinates. All survey questions are conducted through the phone, allowing for consistency between surveyors as well as automated quantitative evaluation of programme performance.

Through the implementation of mobile data collection DelAgua is able to effectively administer and manage large-scale development programmes with expedited technology rollouts, detailed household level education campaigns and comprehensive technology product tracking.

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Mobile data collection

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Logging household identification information & GPS

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Household survey

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Health Education

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Analysis & record keeping

Phase Four

Phase 1
 
Phase 2
 
Phase 3
 
Phase 4
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Phase four of the programme will see 1.25 million people benefit from receiving cookstoves and water filters. During this phase further development to the retail campaign will take place to incorporate regionalised retail operations.

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1,250,000
People

10,000 People Icon

7,000
Villages (Umudugudu)

Funding

Sources

The funding of DelAgua Health’s Rwanda programme is coming from a number of sources. As it is anticipated to be a 20-year programme, the amounts and the sources will vary over time but among them are carbon credits, corporate partnerships and the retail campaign.

How A Carbon Credit is Earned

DelAgua is providing energy efficient water filters and cookstoves to up to 3 million Rwandans.

In return DelAgua receives carbon credits which can be sold to buyers to offset their carbon emissions.

Image: Rwanda Map Image: Poorest 30%

The poorest 30% will receive water filters & cookstoves.

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Our water filters can produce enough clear water to last a family of five for five years.

Carbon Credits

These were created under the UN’s Clean Development Mechanism. The use of water filters and high efficiency cookstoves significantly reduces the requirement for firewood as fuel, which in turn reduces CO2 emissions. DelAgua earns one carbon credit for each tonne of CO2 reduced.

Price Increase

The price of a carbon credit currently stands at under $5.

Over the next few years this can be expected to increase significantly because of major changes in the supply/demand balance.

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Legally binding reductions in emissions, the economic recovery and pressure for stricter targets will increase demand for carbon credits.

High Quality, High Credibility Emissions Reductions

DelAgua's carbon credits comply with the rigorous UN Framework Convention on Climate Change(UNFCCC) requirements of the Clean Development Mechanism. Every credit is independently verified by an accredited auditor, and they meet the strict new requirements of the EU for recognition in the European Union Emissions Trading System post-2013.

DelAgua's carbon credits represent more than emission reductions - they are also a proxy measure for a range of health, gender, employment, education, environment and other development benefits. This distinguishes DelAgua's carbon credits as unique and high value.

If you are interested in working with us as a project partner, carbon credit buyer or supplier please contact us at info@delagua.org and we will direct your query to the right department.

Price Increase

Carbon credits earned in Least Developed Countries, like DelAgua's, command a premium because they can be sold in Europe post-2013 and they are atractive to Voluntary Buyers.

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20 Year Programme

DelAgua is currently three years into a 20 year programme in Rwanda.

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600,000

Filters and stoves will be distributed and, from 2015, a retail programme established.

The end result will be a sustainable business providing employment.

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